RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY: Blog http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog en-us 2005 - 2017 Copyright Ronald Zincone Photography ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) Sat, 23 Sep 2017 01:55:00 GMT Sat, 23 Sep 2017 01:55:00 GMT http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/img/s5/v127/u59443798-o749247924-50.jpg RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY: Blog http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog 90 120 2017 Hurricane Season is NOT connected to climate change http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/9/2017-hurricane-season-is-not-connected-to-climate-change No doubt this year's hurricane season has been deadly and destructive but in no way, in my opinion, is it connected to climate change / global warming.  2004 and 2005 were also very active and destructive years.  People need to do their research before they start pointing towards global warming as the culprit.  

The earth is a living biosphere.  Our planet has geologic and atmospheric processes that help it stablize.  When tropical storms form and move northward from the tropics and eventually either making landfall or spinning themselves out over the ocean, it is nature's way of cooling and stablizing our living and breathing planet.  

If you look into the historical records of tropical meteorology, you will find records indicating that very large hurricanes have formed and made landfall.  The intensity of past hurricanes have reached category 4 and 5 on numerous occasions.  Records show that more then one hurricane has hit the same region within a very short timespan.  Records will indicate that past storms have intensified swiftly in just a short period of time such as we have seen this year with Harvey, Irma and Maria.

People get spoiled.  People forget and get complacent when it comes to weather and other natural disasters.  This year's active and deadly season is directly connected to the return of La Nina where the SST's in the pacific are cooler then average and this usually leads to less wind shear in the Atlantic and warmer SST's.  From 2006 through 2016, we have seen more wind shear and cooler SST's due to a pronounced El Nino.  This year's season is no different from many past seasons and I am talking about going back more then 100 or 200 years.  Now we have all the pro-climate change experts pointing fingers and saying "I told you so".  If climate change is such a big player in this year's activity then why was June through the first half of August so quiet?  Why was there so much dry air, wind shear and Saharan dust in the early part of the season?  Where was global warming then?

Why didn't the A through G storms all become hurricanes and maybe major hurricanes?  Why did tropical storm Lee a dud forming in the same region as Irma and Maria?  Why did Irma weaken from a category 4, 3 and 2 as the eye crossed the keys and headed up the west coast of Florida?  The SST's in that area are certainly ripe to maintain a hurricane's power.  Why is Jose weakening over cooler SST's north of Cape Hatteras?

People, such as the media and other agencies need to be concentrating on educating the public about how to prepare for hurricanes if you live in a coastal zone or inland from a coastal region between Texas and Maine.  We should be proactively teaching the public about what has happened in the past and what WILL happen in the future if we continue to build and live along coastal zones.  People need to be prepared by June 1st each year.  Prepare for the worst and hope for the best!  We need to stop putting so much emphasis on the number of storms we can expect each season and concentrate more on how to prepare for the ONE storm that may make landfall in your area.

One of the most concerned regions is the Northeast, where I reside, because most of the population in this area has never experienced a major landfalling hurricane.  The last category 3 storm to make landfall in southern New England was Carol in 1954 and that was 63 years ago!  Just ask some of the few survivors from that historic storm what it was like.  Our benchmark storm, our "Katrina" was the 1938 Long Island Express hurricane which killed over 600 people and caused billions of "today's dollars" of destruction.  Most of the survivors of that hurricane are past on now but go do some research and read the books about that storm such as "Sudden Sea" and "A Wind to Shake the World".  Read "The Fort Road Tragedy".  And if people's words don't make you a believer of what a real "major" hurricane can do here in the Northeast, do a search with google "1938 Hurricane images" and I guarantee your jaw will drop to the floor when you look at the destruction a category 3 hurricane did to our region.

Let me be blunt here - folks.  Gloria in 85 and Bob in 91, our last two landfalling hurricanes were weak examples compared to the 1938 and 1954.  If people think that Gloria and Bob represented the best nature can bring to our area -- think again.  It is just a matter of time before another "major"- meaning category 3 - hurricane similar to the 38 and 54 repeats history and strikes our region.  This time around -- the destruction and property damage in dollars will be staggering and with the population growth in our coastal region since 1954 and the inexperience of our new generations is a set up for disaster.

 

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) atmosphere extreme harvey hurricane hurricanes irma maria meteorology ronaldzinconephotography severe storm tropical tropics weather http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/9/2017-hurricane-season-is-not-connected-to-climate-change Sat, 23 Sep 2017 01:54:34 GMT
Top 10 tips for better photography http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/9/top-10-tips-for-better-photography Hey friends,

Here are my top 10 tips to improve your photography skills:

1)  Be sure to clean both your front and rear optics of your lenses -- a dirty lens can ruin your image.

2)  Use a tripod for stability and a remote shutter for hands-off camera operation.

3)  When your subject does not allow for a tripod, be sure to use proper hand-holding techniques for good stability, 

      be sure to turn on your lenses' stabilization mode and use the focal length / shutter formula in order to set the

      proper shutter speed to prevent camera shake.

4)  Double up on everything!  This includes batteries and memory cards.  If you shoot for reputation and money,

     be sure to have a second camera, tripod, flash, etc.

5)  Capture your images during the "magic hour" also known as textured or side-lighting.  This is the most beautiful

     light to shoot in.

6)  Be sure that your camera is set to capture images at the highest resolution of your camera's sensor.  This would

     be the "default" setting.  Not doing so would lose you resolution since your settings has downsized the image.

7)  Bracket, Bracket and Bracket more!  This means taking a minimum of three images at three different settings!

8)  Learn and apply the three rules of composition -- Find your subject, focus attention on your subject and 

     simplify!

9)  Your main goal as a photographer is to capture a "proper exposure" and a "tack sharp image".

10)  Practice, Practice and Practice some more!  Photography is a "visual art" and literally "hands-on"!

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 35mm art artist bracket camera canon capture composition dslr exposure film hour image instruction instructor lens lenses magic photo photographer photography ronaldzinconephotography teach teacher visual http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/9/top-10-tips-for-better-photography Sat, 16 Sep 2017 01:00:48 GMT
Hurricane Season prepardness http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/9/hurricane-season-prepardness As we are currently seeing - the 2017 Hurricane Season has turned out to be a "deadly" season and it's not over yet.  What started out to be an early season with some activity in May, June and July indicating a possible high number storm count much of the beginning of August was active but the tropical zones were not primed for intense activity.  Much of this was due to Saharan dust and hostile winds.  As we have seen, the climate in these tropical regions can change rapidly!

We have already set some tropical season records with Harvey as a land falling category 4 hurricane in Texas and now Irma as a land falling category 4 hurricane in Florida.  In addition, as of this blog date, hurricane Jose is also a category 4 in the Atlantic.  We are only half way through the season but now at its peak.

For anyone living along the Gulf and East Coast of the United States, it is vital that you make a "hurricane plan" and have one in place by June 1st of each year - the hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30.  Every family, especially those who reside along the immediate coast, should have a "emergency disaster kit" ready.

You can buy one from the American Red Cross reasonably priced at this link:

American Red Cross emergency kit

NOAA weather radios are something every family has to have no matter where you live in the United States.  Severe weather can occur anywhere.  Here is the link to the Skywarn weather store:

Skywarn weather store

Living in an age where most everyone now has a cell phone -- instant weather alerts can be received immediately so that you can take the proper steps to protect yourself from harm and your property from damage.  As we continue to see and hear, many people still DO NOT take nature's power seriously.  People continue to go into dangerous flood and storm surge zones to capture photos of the waves and wind.  People continue to believe that their cars can turn into boats with the flick of a switch and end up being sweep away by flash flooding or submerged in a road -- TURN AROUND - DON'T DROWN!!!!

People wait too long to evacuate their residences and head into shelters or leave for a region that would provide more safety.  People don't think it will happen to them.  People don't listen, understand or take seriously the National Hurricane Center's projected hurricane path and its CONE.  If you are living in an area that is within the 5-day cone of projection, you need to be preparing for the worst and have a plan in place to get out.  How many lives have been and will be lost between Harvey and Irma due to reasons that are within our control.  

Be sure you check your homeowner's insurance policy and that it is paid and up to date.  Have a copy of this policy in your emergency kit.  Most important, if you live in a coastal region or an inland region that is subject to flooding not only from storm surge but inland river flooding or seepage, you MUST have FLOOD INSURANCE.  It is worth every penny!  I know from experience.  My research indicates that FEMA also pays out $30,000 to cover damage to residential home owners and pays out NOTHING to businesses.  

Below are some valuable links to help aid you during the hurricane season:

National Hurricane Center

Weather Underground

Facebook Atlantic Hurricane Season

Weather.com

Accuweather hurricane page

 

 

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 2017 accuweather center extreme flood flooding harvey hurricane hurricanes irma jose national nhc noaa season service severe skywarn storm surge tropical tropics underground weather http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/9/hurricane-season-prepardness Sun, 10 Sep 2017 16:17:18 GMT
2017 Hurricane Season http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/9/2017-hurricane-season As we have already seen these past couple of weeks, the 2017 Hurricane Season has now entered the record books with Hurricane "Harvey" becoming the costliest natural disaster in the United States.  Category 4 "Harvey" has been more costly then "Katrina" and "Sandy" combined.  Wow!!!  It has been some time, actually since 2005, that a major landfalling hurricane has hit the U.S.  We are now entering the peak of the hurricane season which is around September 10th and, sure enough, we have category 3 hurricane "Irma" progressing across the Atlantic Ocean and forecast to strengthen.

Time and time again, we see the same kind of coastal destruction due to storm surge which, by the way, is the #1 killer in a hurricane.  But yet we continue to build along the coastal areas of the U.S.  We continue hear about people losing their lives because of ignorance or just not making wise decisions.  If you are told to evacuate because you are in a flood zone, the DO SO!  If you are not in a flood zone but are not sure if your homestead will protect you in a tropical system -- LEAVE ANYWAY!!

How many times do we need to hear that people have loss their lives due to driving on flooded roads and thinking that they can turn their cars into boats with the push of a button?  TURN AROUND DON'T DROWN!  Human beings are "egotistical" by nature (no pun intended) and think that nature is less powerful then them or that it can't happen to me.  WRONG!  How many times do we need to experience a KATRINA or HARVEY before we heed the warnings?  If you live anywhere from Maine to Texas -- you need to be prepared BY JUNE 1ST with a disaster kit, a disaster plan and you need to know if you are in a flood zone.  Would you need to evacuate?  Where are the nearest shelters?  You also need to stay tuned to the tropical weather forecasts from June 1st to November 30th each year.

A tropical storm / hurricane is one of nature's most powerful and destructive forces and one which you MUST take seriously!  HARVEY will now join the retired names along with KATRINA, SANDY and IRENE.  Let's hope IRMA does not join that list.  PREPARE FOR THE WORST AND HOPE FOR THE BEST!  The greatest cost of life in a hurricane is due to:

1)  Storm surge

2)  Inland flooding from torrential rains (as we have just seen with Harvey)

3)  Wind

4)  Hurricane-spawned "tornadoes"

Do some research and learn more about these forces of nature, how to prepare for them and how to stay tuned in to the best sources of tropical weather information and not just hype.  

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) damage extreme flood flooding harvey hurricane hurricanes ronaldzinconephotography season storm surge tornadoes tropical tropics weather wind http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/9/2017-hurricane-season Sat, 02 Sep 2017 01:58:25 GMT
Historic images of the major New England Hurricanes http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/4/historic-images-of-the-major-new-england-hurricanes To all of you who are native Rhode Islanders, and from Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, the general public and those of you who are passionate about extreme weather specifically New England Hurricane landfalls and their impact on our region - you can view my database of hundreds of historic photos of all the major New England hurricanes!  Scroll down to the bottom half of my home page and click on the photo galleries for each storm.

I would love your feedback on my feedback page and go ahead and sign my guestbook!!!!

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) England New connecticut extreme hurricane hurricanes island massachusetts meteorology rhode southern storm storms tropical tropics vermont weather http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/4/historic-images-of-the-major-new-england-hurricanes Wed, 05 Apr 2017 20:00:12 GMT
Technology overkill? http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/3/technology-overkill Hello students of photography:

It is my opinion that there has occurred, over the past decade or more, an alarming trend for overkill in technology.  Whether it be computers, cell phones, cameras, lenses, etc..Too much of a good thing can be a bad thing.  Sometimes less is more.  In regards to photography, I find that there is this constant push by the major camera brands to pump out the next greatest camera to the consumer.  In many cases, these camera models are only slightly improved -- maybe in a few more megapixels or the addition of a few more focus points, etc...What we do see is a price jump and just another camera brand model on the market and pasted on magazine page ads for the consumer or prosumer to try to digest and decide if this is the camera they should buy?  

One of the negative drawbacks to the digital age has been and continues to be the flooding of the market with all things digital because this type of technology makes it easy to produce and tweek and mass produce.  I find with many of my students much confusion with digital technology in general never mind all the countless varieties of camera brands and models and designs.  The introduction and push to mirrorless cameras and also cell phone cameras had added even more confusion and mind-boggling choices.

During the age of 35mm film and the fully mechanical SLR, we didn't have these issues due to the type of technology involved and therefore visual artists could concentrate more on the art and science of photography and how to use their simple light boxes to capture and create great artwork.  It is unfortunate, today, that much of what we see on the market, I consider "overkill", is being motivated by profit and competition.

Remember students, what is most important in photography is to learn the art and science of 35mm photography, buy a descent 35mm DSLR but also invest your money in the optics (lenses).  The rest is up to you.  It is the violinist and not the violin.

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 35mm Canon DSLR SLR art artist arts camera digital photographer photography science visual http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2017/3/technology-overkill Fri, 24 Mar 2017 13:26:49 GMT
How to get started in backyard astronomy! http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/how-to-get-started-in-backyard-astronomy Do you often look up at the night sky and stare in amazement of all those countless stars (suns)?  Does it send chills up your spine?  It does for me....since my young teen years and still to this day!  Getting started in backyard astronomy is simple and affordable.  All you need is a good set of binoculars in the 10X50 range.  Binoculars allow you to see more magnification and maintains a wide sweeping view of the milky way.  What does 10X50 mean?  The first number, 10 in this case, is the magnification of the optics; 10X power.  The second number, 50, is the "field of view" FOV in millimeters (mm).  The larger the first number is, the more magnification you get on your subject.  The larger the second number, the more your FOV is.

10X50 binoculars are ideal because they are not too heavy to carry and would not require a tripod for stabilization.  In this way, you can easily hand hold your optics while you visually sweep across the amazing cosmos.  Binoculars in the 10X50 range won't break the bank and are a great jumping off point from naked-eye visualization to the use of telescopes.  The amount of detail you will see with a pair of binoculars is amazing and, actually, could bring you a lifetime of enjoyment!  A good pair of binoculars can be used for nature and bird viewing, landscapes and the night sky.  Many companies make various types of binoculars such as Nikon, Canon, Orion, Zeiss, Kowa and many more.  Be sure to do your research when searching for and purchasing a pair of binoculars!

One caveat is "collimation".  It is not uncommon to order a pair of binoculars and upon arrival in the mail find that the optics are out of collimation meaning that the optics are out of alignment and you see a double image of your subject.  Sometimes this occurs because the optics are bounced around in transit due to either poor packaging or rough handling.  It many also occur from improper collimation at the factory or poor quality control.  You may want to think about going to a camera / optics store where you can touch and feel, ask questions and check for collimation before you purchase and walk away.

Be sure to purchase binoculars with good optical quality and have lenses that are fully multi-coated.  For the night sky, binoculars are great for wide-sweeps of the milky way, meteors, asteroids, auroras, constellations, satellites, the moon and, of course, terrestial viewing.  I use a Celestron Cometron 12X70mm binoculars.  You can also get giant astronomical binoculars that go up to 25X100mm or 25X125mm, but these are much more expensive and would require adequate stablization on a tripod due to their excessive weight.  A good name in this range is Oberwerk (Garrett).  Binoculars also give you the advantage of being able to view with both eyes, (bino), instead of one as you would with a telescope.  So, get yourself a nice pair of 10X50's and see what you have been missing both on our planet earth and beyond.

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) astro astroimaging astronomical astronomy astrophotographer backyard binoculars celestial cosmos extreme night optics photo photographer photographic photography science sky space weather http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/how-to-get-started-in-backyard-astronomy Mon, 31 Aug 2015 14:47:10 GMT
Being Prepared for the Hurricane Season! http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/being-prepared-for-the-hurricane-season We are now in the "heart" of the 2015 hurricane season which began on June 1, 2015.  Each hurricane season begins on June 1st and ends on November 30th and so it is important that you prepare for each and every tropical season by June 1st.  Although the "heart" of the season and when most activity occurs is in the months of August and September, especially for us in New England, you must be "tropical storm ready" by June 1st of each year.  Remember, all it takes is ONE STORM to ruin your life.  Below are some official links that will give you all the necessary and vital information to learning how to become hurricane prepared.  Also, stay tuned to my brand new course and seminars "New England Hurricanes: Past, Present and Future" coming next Spring 2016!

http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/hurricane

 

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Tips and Techniques on Capturing Lightning! http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/tips-and-techniques-on-capturing-lightning To learn more about how I capture spectacular daytime and nighttime lightning read my new Blog post at:

http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.net/blog-post/tips-and-techniques-on-capturing-lightning/

 

 

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) AdWords Adwords Amazon Blog Camera Canon Depot England Google Institute Island Kingston Lens National New Photographic Photography Post Rhode Ronalds Service SkyWarn Society Spotter Weather aStore adult affiliate amazon associate astro astroimaging astronomical astronomy astrophotography blog bolt camera canon celestial cosmos depot digital ecommerce education expert extreme google hurricane instructing instruction instructor learning lens lenses lifelong lightning lunar moon night nightsky of optical optics photo photographic photography post ronald ronalds ronaldzinconephotography satellite science severe sky solar southern storm system teach teacher teaching telescope traveling trigger tropical weather zincone http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/tips-and-techniques-on-capturing-lightning Mon, 17 Aug 2015 14:00:13 GMT
Learning and Understanding "The Crop Factor" by Todd Vorenkamp http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/learning-and-understanding-the-crop-factor-by-todd-vorenkamp Click on the link below to read a great post explaining the confusion behind "The Crop Factor" by Todd Vorenkamp:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/photography/tips-and-solutions/understanding-crop-factor?BI=4906

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 1.5X 1.6X 35mm APS-C camera canon crop digital factor lens lenses nikon optical optics photo photographic photography ronald ronaldzinconephotography sensor size zincone http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/learning-and-understanding-the-crop-factor-by-todd-vorenkamp Tue, 11 Aug 2015 14:24:17 GMT
10 Tips to help you select a proper lens by Ronald Zincone http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/10-tips-to-help-you-select-a-proper-lens-by-ronald-zincone Selecting a proper lens for your DSLR can be confusing and overwhelming but with some basic information and guidance, lens selection can be exciting, less confusing and save you money!  Here are 10 quick tips you need to know:

1)  Selecting a lens or lenses should be based on what type of photography you do.

If you are into capturing sports, wildlife and high magnifications of landscapes and the moon, you would need a telephoto lens and/or super-telephoto lens.  This can be anywhere from 100mm to 600mm or more.  For scenics and travel, a lens in the wide-angle to normal range, or say 12mm to 35mm range is a good choice.  If you are trying to capture travel scenes with people in it then a normal 50mm lens is good.  Portraiture requires a focal length range 85mm to 135mm with 85mm and 100mm being the "sweet" spot. 

2)  Prime lens or Zoom lens?

There has always been two camps (Prime and Zoom) - even with today's advancements in optical technology, "prime" lenses are still a tad bit sharper, weigh less and cost less.  These lenses are easier to engineer optically and have less optical elements.  They are better for your budget and are lighter then zooms.  "prime" lenses also tend to be faster, meaning that their apertures (len's opening) open wider to let in more light (an advantage for low-light photography) for example, f2.8, f2.0, f1.8, f1.4, f1.2   Another advantage is that wide open apertures give you, the photographer, more softer backgrounds (less DOF (depth of field) also known as Bokeh.  Disadvantages are that selecting "prime" lens means that you will need to interchange them more often and you would have more lenses in your camera bag.  "Zoom" lenses, on the other hand, are more flexible in the field.  Zooming your lenses, say 24-105mm, allows you to instantly "crop" your composition and eliminate distractions aka "clutter".  With zooms, you carry fewer lenses, your camera bag is lighter and in some cases, purchasing what is known as an "all-in-one-lens" (16-250mm) allows you to keep just one lens on your camera all the time.  Disadvantages are that "zooms" are more costly, weigh more and are a little less sharper.

3)  "Kit", Intermediate or Pro lens?

So what quality lens should you invest in? 

"Kit" lenses are designed for the novice and those on a strict budget.  There ok to use if you are first starting out and they will give you decent images.  Your best choice is to upgrade to an intermediate lens say in the $400 to $600 range.  The saying is "You Get What You Pay For" and so this certainly applies to photography.  Better quality lenses give you sharper optics and more robust lens construction meaning that when using your lenses in harsh conditions, the weather-sealing in your lens design will help you.  Pro lenses such as the Canon "L" lenses (with red stripe) and Nikon's "Nikkor" lenses are the most expensive but you get the best in optical engineering for high resolution images and weather-sealing that will hold up to the harshest conditions.

4)  Purchase a "protection" filter for your new lens.

It is a low-cost investment but a vital one to purchase what is called a UV/Haze or "protection" filter to cover ALL your lenses!  Be sure to purchase a filter that is of the same diameter as your lens, e.g., 58mm....you should buy this filter and place it on your lens before you start taking photos.  You do not want to get dust or scratches, dings, dents, liquids onto your new lens.  The more you pay for your lens, the more important it is to have a "protection" filter on.  

5)  What quality filters should I purchase for my lenses?

The quality of your lens filters are just as important as your len's quality.  You would not want to buy a $20 filter to put on your $1,500 Canon "L" Pro lens.  Matching good quality filters with high quality lenses are important to good resolution and protection of your lenses.  Some good filter brands are Tiffen, Hoya, B&W, Schneider, Heliopan.  Be sure to look for a filter that is "fully multi-coated" FMC  If you are purchasing the highest quality lenses then you should be buying the highest quality filters.  The only needed filters in today's "digital age" are the "protection or UV/Haze", the Polarizer and you may want to invest in a Neutral Density or Graduated Neutral Density filter.

6)  Use the lens hood that came with your lens.

Higher cost and therefore higher quality lenses usually automatically come with a lens hood.  Lower quality lenses may not so you would need to buy one.  Either way, putting that lens hood (shade) on your lens is just as important as using a "protection" filter.  The lens hood does three things:  1) protects your lens optics from stray light; 2) protects your lens from damage; and 3) acts as a rain shield from when you are shooting in "misty" or "drizzle" conditions.

7)  Pros and Cons of "IS" aka "VR" "VC".....stabilization.

Plain and simple....if you are hand-holding your lenses most of the time, purchasing a lens that has built-in Image Stabilization (IS) is crucial.  Nikon calls it vibration reduction (VR) and other brands use other terms.  Look for a switch on the lens that indicates stablization or IS, VR, VC, etc....if your not sure, ask your photo dealer.  This stablization technology helps prevent obtaining "blurry" images due to camera shake and this technology works wonderfully but it is limited.  A lens with stablization technology will cost you several hundred dollars more but is well worth it.  It has become more standard now for camera companies to include "IS" on many of your bundled "kit" lenses.  e.g., 18-55mm.

8)  For those of you who  may be more advanced in photography or find that what you do involves making lots of prints and enlargements, "resolution" is king.  Resolution is how much detail you can capture in your subject.  If you are using a full-frame camera you would most likely benefit from using Pro quality lenses.   This matching between the camera's processing unit and quality of sensor (digital chip) with Pro quality optics makes for high-resolution imagery which is vital when enlargements are needed.

9)  Lens 101:  Always keep your optical glass elements (front and rear) clean and cover with caps.

You should make it a habit, before you shoot, to clean your front and rear lens optical glass.  You would not want anything on your optics such as stains, dust, etc...to show up in your images.  After your photoshoot is over, immediately cover your front and rear elements with your lens caps.

10)  Lastly, try to keep your lenses (and camera) away from beach areas where sand and salt is deadly to your photographic equipment.  If you must photograph at the beach, keep your gear (especially your lenses) protected.

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) Canon Nikkor camera digital lens lenses optical optics ronaldzinconephotography http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/10-tips-to-help-you-select-a-proper-lens-by-ronald-zincone Mon, 03 Aug 2015 13:46:50 GMT
Announcing ronaldzinconephotography's new digital photography lens store! http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/announcing-ronaldzinconephotographys-new-digital-photography-lens-store Announcing my new digital photography store at www.ronaldzinconephotography.net At my store, you will be able to search and shop for the best products in digital photography directly from Amazon.com for all your photography needs! Discover the 100% customer service and satisfaction from Amazon and ronaldzinconephotography and don’t forget to check out my online portfolio at ronaldzinconephotography.com]]> ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) Amazon USA amazon amazon.com digital lens lenses photographic photography ronaldzinconephotography.net store http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/8/announcing-ronaldzinconephotographys-new-digital-photography-lens-store Sun, 02 Aug 2015 16:51:54 GMT southern New England Photography Meetup group http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/4/southern-new-england-photography-meetup-group  

Be sure to check out Ronald's "southern New England Photography" Meetup Group at:
 
http://www.meetup.com/southern-New-England-Photography-Meetup/
 
 
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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) Canon England Meetup New Photography camera classes digital education educational england group instruction instructor learn learning meetup new photographer photographic photography ronald ronaldzinconephotography southern teacher workshop workshops zincone http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/4/southern-new-england-photography-meetup-group Wed, 29 Apr 2015 12:40:19 GMT
Lenses http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/4/lenses I tell my students to invest in their lenses more so then there cameras.  Why?  The kinds of lenses that you buy -- brand, focal length, fast or slow, zooms or primes and optical quality all play a major role in capturing high-resolution imagery.  The 35mm DSLR camera is the camera to own if you are serious about getting creative and building your portfolio.  The DSLR also allows you to build an arsenal of optics - lenses -- your tools in your tool bag so to speak.  When it comes to lens selection, there are many things to weigh up before you decide to spend some of your hard earned money.

Which brand?

You can base your lens choice on the camera brand that you own, such as Canon or Nikon.  Matching the camera brand with the lens brand can be good since the technology is matched.  This may lead to better performance and fewer issues but may be more costly.  Think about other named brands such as Tamron, Tokina, Rokinon and Sigma.  These brands offer good optical performance and will save you quite a few dollars.  Just be sure that the lens you buy indicates that it is for your particular brand of camera.  For instance, "Tamron 18-200mm lens for Canon".  Do plenty of research on the lens you are thinking about purchasing and be sure to check out the reviews.  You would need to consider not only the brand and any cost savings on your budget but also focal length, fast or slow glass, zooms versus primes and optical quality.

Which focal length?

The lens focal length choice is based on what kind of photography you are pursuing.  Short focal length lenses usually stay within a range from 10mm to 55mm.  Most of your "kit" lenses are 18-55mm.  These lenses are optimized for "scenic" photography because they cover a wide field of view but will give you less magnification.  Lenses below 35mm will give you a wider field of view and thus more coverage and less magnification.  The downside is that you will have to deal with more expansive distortion.  This distortion is seen in your subjects as curved lines which become more pronounced the closer to the edge of your image.  This type of distortion is caused by the curvature of the lens and the lower your focal length, such as 8mm or 14mm, the more curvature and distortion you get.  The 35mm focal length is on the borderline between wide-angle and normal.  This focal length is very nice to shoot with.  The 50mm or 55mm on a "kit" lens is what is called a "standard" or "normal" lens because the optics give you a view that is very much like how you see things with your eyes.  The 50mm was, back in the film days, known as the "nifty fifty" and is a great focal length for composing environmental portraits and also great for travel and night-sky imaging.  It is also a very nice landscape or night-sky lens since it gives you a nice field of view without expansive distortion.  The focal length range of 70mm - 135mm is ideal for shooting portraits and, as a medium telephoto range, can be ideally used for travel and landscapes subjects.  As we get into longer focal lengths not only do we increase magnification but our image subject is compressed within the frame.

If you are shooting wildlife and sports, then the 200mm or higher focal length is for you.  These lenses are much longer focal lengths and will compress your subject even further.  These lenses are longer and heavier and so you must also think about the weight you will be carrying and the space in your camera bag.  The 200mm range is also very good for portraits, travel, landscapes as well as wildlife and sports.  Once again, remember that optical quality, zooms vs primes and the speed of your lens will determine weight and cost.  The 400mm and above focal length is now getting you into "super telephoto" territory.  These lenses can be much heavier to carry and to hand-hold and will take up more space.  The 400mm is a very popular focal length for imaging wildlife and sports.  The 400mm can also be used for magnifying on scenic landscapes and for celestial use. 

Remember that you must consider all the various factors before you purchase your optics.  Are you hand-holding or using a monopod or tripod?  Which subjects do you mostly photograph?  Do you need "stablization technology" on your lens?  Do you need a zoom or prime lens?  Is a "Kit" lens sufficient or do you need higher quality such as the Canon "L" or the Nikon "Nikkor" lenses or maybe a mid-range quality lens?  How wide open does the aperture go?  There is usually quite a cost difference between a lens that opens to f2.8 as opposed to f4 or f5.6

STAY TUNED FOR MY NEXT BLOG ENTRY WHERE I WILL COVER FAST VS SLOW AND ZOOM VS PRIMES LENSES!

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 35mm ASSNE America Artists Astronomical Beavertail Boston C.P.C. CPC Canon Certified Connecticut Consultant ECONN EOS England Exchange Guild Island Jamestown Judith Leonid Massachusetts Museum NASA NatGeo National New PPA PPARI Photographers Photographic Photography Planetary Professional Report Rhode Ronald SLR Science Service SkyWarn Society Southern The Weather Zincone adult art artist artwork astro astroimaging astronomical astronomy astrophotography aurora award better binoculars borealis camera canon celestial class classes classroom closeup comets cosmos course courses cyclones dawn digital dusk eclipse educate education educational enrichment eye-piece field film flower flowers google hands-on high-resolution hour hurricane hurricanes image imaging instructing instruction instructor lapse learn learnconnect learning lens lenses lesson lessons lifelong light lighthouse lightning lights low low-light lunar macro magic meteor meteorities meteors moon night-sky nightsky northern of one-on-one optical optics photo photographer photographic photography piggyback planets projection ronaldzinconephotography ronaldzinconephotography.com science scientific seminar seminars severe shower skywarn solar space teacher teaching trip trips weather winning your http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/4/lenses Mon, 27 Apr 2015 14:10:51 GMT
ronaldzinconephotography's outdoor workshops http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/3/ronaldzinconephotographys-outdoor-workshops Hello students of photography!

After a brutal onslaught of winter weather, let's get ourselves excited about the upcoming spring, summer and early fall 2015.  This is the time of year when I introduce my hands-on, interactive outdoor workshops in 35mm photography.  Go to my website page "Workshops", contact me or sign up for my email newsletters.

These outdoor field trips take place at various scenic locations throughout southern New England, April to October, and will give you, the student, a great opportunity to apply what you have learned in my class.  Photography is part of the "visual arts" and we must "literally" do it hands-on.  It is the best way to learn and having me, as your instructor, by your side expedites the learning process.  So, stay tuned to blog entries or sign up for my email newsletters.

Hope to see you soon!

ronald

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 35mm ASSNE America Artists Astronomical Beavertail Boston C.P.C. CPC Canon Certified Connecticut Consultant ECONN EOS England Exchange Guild Island Jamestown Judith Leonid Massachusetts Museum NASA NatGeo National New PPA PPARI Photographers Photographic Photography Planetary Professional Report Rhode Ronald SLR Science Service SkyWarn Society Southern The Weather Zincone adult art artist artwork astro astroimaging astronomical astronomy astrophotography aurora award better binoculars borealis camera canon celestial class classes classroom closeup comets cosmos course courses cyclones dawn digital dusk eclipse educate education educational enrichment eye-piece field film flower flowers google hands-on high-resolution hour hurricane hurricanes image imaging instructing instruction instructor lapse learn learnconnect learning lens lenses lesson lessons lifelong light lighthouse lightning lights low low-light lunar macro magic meteor meteorities meteors moon night-sky nightsky northern of one-on-one optical optics photo photographer photographic photography piggyback planets projection ronaldzinconephotography ronaldzinconephotography.com science scientific seminar seminars severe shower skywarn solar space teacher teaching trip trips weather winning your http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/3/ronaldzinconephotographys-outdoor-workshops Wed, 25 Mar 2015 13:56:51 GMT
Basic camera-on-tripod astrophotography tips and techniques http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/3/basic-camera-on-tripod-astrophotography-tips-and-techniques Astrophotography aka "night-sky photography" in its most basic form starts out with your everyday 35mm DSLR camera, a tripod and a remote shutter release.  In today's 'digital age', everyone can attempt and be successful at celestial photography!

Below are some tips (the do's and don'ts) on how to get started in this specialized, unique, challenging but very rewarding type of photography!

 

#1    Your basic 35mm DSLR camera is all you need to capture some stunning celestial images of the cosmos.

#2    A light but sturdy tripod is a must for stability which is crucial in this type of photography.

#3    A remote shutter release is also a must when you mount your camera onto a tripod.

#4    Start out shooting celestial subjects such as constellations, star trails, planetary conjunctions, meteors and the the moon.  These subjects are easier to capture.

#5    As with daytime nature photography, try to combine a nice landscape with your celestial subject in order to create a visually interesting composition.  For example, a planetary conjunction of bright Venus and Jupiter in the western twilight sky along with a nicely positioned tree in the foreground.

#6    For simple camera-on-tripod mounted astroimaging, keep your image exposure times below 30 seconds so that you don't create star trails unless that is what you are going after.

#7    The best time for astrophotography is when the atmosphere is settled usually late at night or during the early morning hours before sunrise.

#8    When setting up your camera and tripod, watch for any stray light that can ruin your images such as your neighbor's motion lights, car headlights, airplanes, etc.

#9    Try to image at a dark-sky site away from light pollution.  The sky will be darker and your exposures can be longer.

#10   If you are in the rural areas, be sure to have a partner with you or let someone know where you will be.

#11  Be prepared!  Bring a first-aid kit, cell phone, flashlight, extra batteries and memory cards, mosquito repellent, warm layered clothing, water and hi-protein snacks.

#12  Astro imaging during the winter months in cold temperatures are especially problematic since you will have to alert for hypothermia and dehydration.  Camera and cell phone batteries can also drain faster during the cold temperatures.

#13  Be patient, diligent and be willing to sacrifice sleep.

#14  Use the "preview" on your LCD screen to analyze and review your images in order that you may tweek them for better results.

#15  Digital is cheap so don't be afraid to take a lot of images.

#16  Bring all your lenses with you.  You will never know what astronomical subject will appear.  Many "keeper" images are a result of being in the right place at the right time -- luck!

#17  Keep an eye on your lens's front objective for any "dew".  Dew formation on your optics will shutdown your imaging session.  Use a portable hair dryer to remove the dew.  Do not hold the dryer too close to your optics.

#18  Keep an eye on all parts of the sky.

#19  Keep extra batteries in your pockets so that they stay warm from your body heat.

#20  Be optimistic and have fun under the stars!!!

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 35mm ASSNE America Artists Astronomical Beavertail Boston C.P.C. CPC Canon Certified Connecticut Consultant ECONN EOS England Exchange Guild Island Jamestown Judith Leonid Massachusetts Museum NASA NatGeo National New PPA PPARI Photographers Photographic Photography Planetary Professional Report Rhode Ronald SLR Science Service SkyWarn Society Southern The Weather Zincone adult art artist artwork astro astroimaging astronomical astronomy astrophotography aurora award better binoculars borealis camera canon celestial class classes classroom closeup comets cosmos course courses cyclones dawn digital dusk eclipse educate education educational enrichment eye-piece field film flower flowers google hands-on high-resolution hour hurricane hurricanes image imaging instructing instruction instructor lapse learn learnconnect learning lens lenses lesson lessons lifelong light lighthouse lightning lights low low-light lunar macro magic meteor meteorities meteors moon night-sky nightsky northern of one-on-one optical optics photo photographer photographic photography piggyback planets projection ronaldzinconephotography ronaldzinconephotography.com science scientific seminar seminars severe shower skywarn solar space teacher teaching trip trips weather winning your http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/3/basic-camera-on-tripod-astrophotography-tips-and-techniques Mon, 16 Mar 2015 18:12:45 GMT
Off-camera Shoe Cord -- Part 2 http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/3/off-camera-shoe-cord----part-2 From an article "Off-camera flash photography" pg. 60, EOS Magazine, January-March 2015

 

"Taking a Speedlite off-camera means that you need to find a way to trigger the flash to fire in synch with the shutter being opened.  There are several methods available.

The most straightforward is to use a Canon Off-camera Shoe Cord OC-E3.  This is a fully dedicated cable that links the camera hotshoe to the Speedlite flash retaining full automatic controls and settings.  However, the coiled cord is only 60cm long when fully stretched, so there are limited options for using the flash creatively.

The earlier Off-camera Shoe Cord 2 is similar, but lacks the moisture and dust resistance (with weather-proofed cameras) of the current cord.

The original off-camera shoe cord was designed for the Canon T90 camera and Speedlite 300TL and is not compatible with EOS cameras.

Canon also offers a Speedlite Bracket SB-E2 that comprises a flash bracket and the OC-E3 cable together.  This allows the Speedlites 430EX, 430EXII, 580EX, 580EXII and 600EX-RT to be securely attached and complete automatic functions to be retained."

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 35mm ASSNE America Artists Astronomical Beavertail Boston C.P.C. CPC Canon Certified Connecticut Consultant ECONN EOS England Exchange Guild Island Jamestown Judith Leonid Massachusetts Museum NASA NatGeo National New PPA PPARI Photographers Photographic Photography Planetary Professional Report Rhode Ronald SLR Science Service SkyWarn Society Southern The Weather Zincone adult art artist artwork astro astroimaging astronomical astronomy astrophotography aurora award better binoculars borealis camera canon celestial class classes classroom closeup comets cosmos course courses cyclones dawn digital dusk eclipse educate education educational enrichment eye-piece field film flower flowers google hands-on high-resolution hour hurricane hurricanes image imaging instructing instruction instructor lapse learn learnconnect learning lens lenses lesson lessons lifelong light lighthouse lightning lights low low-light lunar macro magic meteor meteorities meteors moon night-sky nightsky northern of one-on-one optical optics photo photographer photographic photography piggyback planets projection ronaldzinconephotography ronaldzinconephotography.com science scientific seminar seminars severe shower skywarn solar space teacher teaching trip trips weather winning your http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/3/off-camera-shoe-cord----part-2 Wed, 11 Mar 2015 11:49:39 GMT
Off-Camera flash (Part One) http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/3/off-camera-flash-part-one (from an article in the January-March 2015 EOS Magazine)

 

Using a Speedlite as a creative light gives a new depth to images.  With a Speedlite on the camera hotshoe, or the built-in flash, the angle that the light hits the subject is flat and the result is often quite stark.  Moving the Speedlite off the camera hotshoe allows a photographer to position the light to create shadows that give depth and texture to pictures.

On-camera flash aimed directly at the subject often creates unflattering red-eye in human subjects, and green-eye in cats and other animals.  Using an off-camera flash will usually eliminate this.

A single Speedlite flash on the camera is a small sized light source.  Softer more flattering light is created by comparatively larger light sources, though there is a physical limit to the size of diffuser for on-camera flash.  It is not just the softening effect, but also the direction of the light that is important.  Light from the side creates shadows and highlights texture too.

Many current Speedlites have a flash head that tilts, allowing ceilings and walls to be used as large reflectors to create more diffuse light sources and directional light.  However, fractional repositioning of the camera or lack of nearby walls or ceilings limits this approach.

Flash is often used not only because a scene is dark, but also to balance shadow elements in a scene with the ambient light.  Canon cameras can expose the ambient and the flash elements in the picture automatically.  If the results are not as expected there are separate controls for exposure compensation and flash exposure compensation on the camera.

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 35mm ASSNE America Artists Astronomical Beavertail Boston C.P.C. CPC Canon Certified Connecticut Consultant ECONN EOS England Exchange Guild Island Jamestown Judith Leonid Massachusetts Museum NASA NatGeo National New PPA PPARI Photographers Photographic Photography Planetary Professional Report Rhode Ronald SLR Science Service SkyWarn Society Southern The Weather Zincone adult art artist artwork astro astroimaging astronomical astronomy astrophotography aurora award better binoculars borealis camera canon celestial class classes classroom closeup comets cosmos course courses cyclones dawn digital dusk eclipse educate education educational enrichment eye-piece field film flower flowers google hands-on high-resolution hour hurricane hurricanes image imaging instructing instruction instructor lapse learn learnconnect learning lens lenses lesson lessons lifelong light lighthouse lightning lights low low-light lunar macro magic meteor meteorities meteors moon night-sky nightsky northern of one-on-one optical optics photo photographer photographic photography piggyback planets projection ronaldzinconephotography ronaldzinconephotography.com science scientific seminar seminars severe shower skywarn solar space teacher teaching trip trips weather winning your http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/3/off-camera-flash-part-one Tue, 03 Mar 2015 19:07:53 GMT
Canon news http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/2/canon-news Canon has announced the new EOS 5DS and 5DS R Digital SLR cameras.  With a 50.6-megapixel CMOS sensor, the 5DS and 5DS R have just become the highest-resolution full-frame DSLR cameras on the market.  Designed with the still photographer in mind, these cameras will deliver the absolute best in image quality with a variety of built-in features for photographers to take control of all aspects of their shooting.  Where they differ is the 5DS R's low-pass filter (LPF) effect cancellation that allows photographers to squeeze every last bit of resolution from the sensor.  The only downside of this is the greater potential for moire and other color artifacts.  Otherwise, the EF-mount 5DS and 5DS R share the same features, including Dual DIGIC 6 Image Processors for handling the vast amounts of information produced during image capture and an ISO range of 100-6400, which can be expanded to 50 or 12800. 

5DS -- Body Only $3,699.00        5DS R -- Body Only $3,899.00

 

Canon has also come out with the new Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM lens

Ultra-wide-angle lenses have seen a renaissance of sorts with numerous manufacturers updating and adding to their line.  Just last year, Canon released a new 16-35mm lens and is now introducing the even wider EF 11-24mm f/4L USM lens.  The full-frame L-series lens has an impressive starting focal length of 11mm that will allow users to capture a seriously wide field of view.  Also, the constant f/4 aperture guarantees consistent performance and light transmission throughout the zoom range.  Price: $2,999.00

 

Canon has also released the EOS Rebel T6i and T6s Digital SLR cameras

The cameras are variations on the same basic form, but the T6s features a topside LCD panel in addition to the 3.0 inch rear LCD, a Quick Control Dial, an integrated Horizontal level and Built-in HDR in movie mode.  Also announced are new Rebel T6i and T6s kits bundled with zoom lenses.

Prices:

T6i -- Body Only  $749.00

T6i -- w/18-55mm STM lens @ $899.00

T6i -- w/18-135mm STM lens @ $1,099.00

T6s -- Body Only @ $849.00

T6s -- w/18-55mm STM lens @ $1,199.00

 

Canon has announced the super compact ELPH 350 HS and the long-zoom SX410 IS cameras.  Entry-level shooters will appreciate the ELPH 350 HS, with its 20MP high-resolution CMOS sensor, 12x zoom lens, full HD video, and built-in Wi-Fi connectivity with NFC, which makes it compatible with the CS100 Connect Station.  The SX410 IS, on the other hand, expands upon the range of its predecessor with a 24-960mm equivalent 40x optical zoom lens, as well as intelligent IS for blur-free imaging.

ELPH 350 HS  $209.99

SX410 IS    $279.99

 

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 35mm ASSNE America Artists Astronomical Beavertail Boston C.P.C. CPC Canon Certified Connecticut Consultant ECONN EOS England Exchange Guild Island Jamestown Judith Leonid Massachusetts Museum NASA NatGeo National New PPA PPARI Photographers Photographic Photography Planetary Professional Report Rhode Ronald SLR Science Service SkyWarn Society Southern The Weather Zincone adult art artist artwork astro astroimaging astronomical astronomy astrophotography aurora award better binoculars borealis camera canon celestial class classes classroom closeup comets cosmos course courses cyclones dawn digital dusk eclipse educate education educational enrichment eye-piece field film flower flowers google hands-on high-resolution hour hurricane hurricanes image imaging instructing instruction instructor lapse learn learnconnect learning lens lenses lesson lessons lifelong light lighthouse lightning lights low low-light lunar macro magic meteor meteorities meteors moon night-sky nightsky northern of one-on-one optical optics photo photographer photographic photography piggyback planets projection ronaldzinconephotography ronaldzinconephotography.com science scientific seminar seminars severe shower skywarn solar space teacher teaching trip trips weather winning your http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/2/canon-news Mon, 09 Feb 2015 15:07:29 GMT
Working in the Cold http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/2/working-in-the-cold From an article in the February 2015 issue of Outdoor Photographer, page 54:

"Years ago, cameras had to be taken apart and prepared for cold weather or they would fail.  That's no longer true.  All cameras today can function just fine to temperatures well below zero, except...

Batteries quit working as the temperatures drop.  They will work fine again once they warm up.  I keep extra batteries in a pocket in my jacket with a handwarmer.  You could keep an extra battery in a pocket next to your body, but exchanging batteries will be painful.

Condensation is a big problem with cameras, so never keep the camera next to your body.  Even in winter, your body puts off a lot of moisture, which will condense on a cold camera body.  Also, never bring an exposed cold camera inside a house or a warm car because serious condensation can occur, which can mean camera failure and shipment to a repair location.  Put your camera away inside a sealed camera bag or a plastic garbage bag until it warms up.

A cold camera is a good thing when it's snowing because the snow can be brushed off without it melting.  But never blow off snow with your breath or you'll add a layer of condensation, which is really a problem if that happens to be on your lens.

Warm clothes in layers are key, along with good, insulated boots, flexible gloves and a warm hat.  Warm, insulated boots are very important because, as a photographer, you'll be standing a lot as you set up shots and wait for the light.  Cold feet will send you home quickly.

For gloves, check out hunting stores.  Think about it, a hunter needs gloves that are both warm and flexible, plus they usually have some sort of gripping material to allow you to grip things (such as a camera and its controls).  Growing up in Minnesota, I never found "half" gloves or mittens that exposed fingers useful.  Cold camera bodies and tripods were way too brutal for bare skin.

 

 

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ronald@ronaldzinconephotography.com (RONALD ZINCONE PHOTOGRAPHY) 35mm ASSNE America Artists Astronomical Beavertail Boston C.P.C. CPC Canon Certified Connecticut Consultant ECONN EOS England Exchange Guild Island Jamestown Judith Leonid Massachusetts Museum NASA NatGeo National New PPA PPARI Photographers Photographic Photography Planetary Professional Report Rhode Ronald SLR Science Service SkyWarn Society Southern The Weather Zincone adult art artist artwork astro astroimaging astronomical astronomy astrophotography aurora award better binoculars borealis camera canon celestial class classes classroom closeup comets cosmos course courses cyclones dawn digital dusk eclipse educate education educational enrichment eye-piece field film flower flowers google hands-on high-resolution hour hurricane hurricanes image imaging instructing instruction instructor lapse learn learnconnect learning lens lenses lesson lessons lifelong light lighthouse lightning lights low low-light lunar macro magic meteor meteorities meteors moon night-sky nightsky northern of one-on-one optical optics photo photographer photographic photography piggyback planets projection ronaldzinconephotography ronaldzinconephotography.com science scientific seminar seminars severe shower skywarn solar space teacher teaching trip trips weather winning your http://www.ronaldzinconephotography.com/blog/2015/2/working-in-the-cold Wed, 04 Feb 2015 16:34:56 GMT